Posts Tagged ‘2009’

Random song post, Volume 11

July 2, 2010

Mayday Parade – “Jamie All Over” (A Lesson in Romantics, Fearless, 2007): Combining the dual vocals of frontman Derek Sanders and former vocalist/guitarist/lyricist Jason Lancaster, and boasting a high level of production courtesy of Zack Odom & Kenneth Mount, the irresistably catchy pop rock of, “Jamie All Over, ” can’t be ignored, nor denied.  Jake Bundrick’s drums are simple, solid and laden with just the right amount of creativity without the tendency to overplay.  Rounded out with occasional bursts of half-time during the bridge and outro, “Jamie All Over, ” is yet another excellent entry into a genre that could use more songs like this.

The Swellers – “Fire Away” (Ups and Downsizing, Fueled By Ramen, 2009): Immediately coming out of the gate with a 6/8 attack of aggressive drums and guitars, this unrelenting burst of energy only briefly comes down during the verses, which itself is short-lived, bringing to mind early Foo Fighters.  Even more Foo comparisons can be found in frontman Nick Diener’s vocals and guitar, and his brother Jonathan’s fantastic work on the drum kit, similar to the chemistry found in Dave Grohl and his drummer Taylor Hawkins.  As a die-hard Foo fanatic, it’s easy to see this Michigan quartet filling their shoes one day-in fact, they might already have.

Random song post, Volume 10

June 16, 2010

Had a little extra time on my hands.  Reviewed a few extra songs.  Here ya go.

All Time Low – “Lost In Stereo” (Nothing Personal, Hopeless, 2009): Fun, exciting rock from a band that could very well be sliding into Fall Out Boy and blink182’s shoes at this very moment.  With similarities to most of Cartel and New Found Glory’s respective catalogs of music, it’s a solid entry into the pop/punk genre.

The Spill Canvas – “Our Song” (Realities EP, Sire, 2010): Despite a noticeable gap since their last full-length, South Dakota’s The Spill Canvas have managed to tide us over with the recent release of two EPs, Abnormalities and Realities, the latter of which boasts the single, “Our Song, ” easily the epitome of everything this band stands for when it comes to music and a fine representation of their sound.  Frontman Nick Thomas’ distinctive, somewhat aggressive voice drives the song, while the rest of the band follows along nicely with appropriate guitars and drums.

Weezer – “I’m Your Daddy” (Raditude, DGC/Interscope, 2009): On Weezer’s seventh full-length Raditude, these emo/powerpop pioneers took their already diverse musical history into yet another direction, best indicated on songs like the singles, “(If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To, ” and, “I’m Your Daddy.  ”  It’s the latter of the two songs that sees frontman Rivers Cuomo in prime shape, bringing back a voice not heard since most of the 90s and a band that seems to remember how they used to sound.  With a fantastic mix of drum machines, synthesizer, and Weezer’s trademark over-the-top guitars, “I’m Your Daddy, ” stands as a great example of how far Weezer has come, and what they’re still capable of.

Silversun Pickups – “The Royal We” (Swoon, Dangerbird, 2009): Awesome.  Just awesome.  Hard to believe such a thunderous sound (especially during the chorus) could come from a bunch of shoegazers like the Silversun Pickups.  Touches of string instruments add to the tension ever present throughout the song, and frontman Brian Aubert’s voice sounds just as good as ever.

Random song post, Volume 9

March 27, 2010

Songs I’d forgotten about, or overlooked, but now can’t stop listening to:

Augustana – “Boston” (All the Stars and Boulevards, Epic, 2005): At a time when so many bands are following whatever trend is current at the time (such as Owl City-esque electronica or Brokencyde-style crunkcore), it’s extremely refreshing to hear a band like Augustana, one that owes as much to pop/rock kings like Counting Crows and Goo Goo Dolls as they do to the trendy emo/indie genre.  “Boston, “ has made its way onto the soundtrack of many a primetime soap opera, and serves as background music to any TV advertisement featuring an emotional scene, all for good reason-it’s a well-written, piano-centered, pop/rock gem that never allows the musicianship to get too out of control, yet you know it has that potential.  The slow crescendo starts at the beginning, with just piano and vocals, eventually layering drums, guitars and bass on top as time goes by.  Before long, a string section joins the party, and the song has now hit a stellar high, instantly bringing to mind a group of talented musicians rocking out as hard as possible.  That simple beginning of piano and voice returns at the end, perfectly wrapping everything up, reminding the listener what’s it like to play music with more than just dollar signs in your eyes.  This is precisely what it’s all about.

The Get Up Kids – “The One You Want” (Guilt Show, Vagrant, 2004): In 2004, The Get Up Kids successfully rebounded from 2002’s oft-derided On A Wire with Guilt Show, which showcased a progression from On A Wire while bringing back many of the elements that made the band so special in the first place.  Lead single, “The One You Want, “ features a welcome piano part from keyboardist James Dewees, almost as if to remind the band he’s still a member.  Ryan Pope’s drums are big and wonderful, the guitars are loud but never dominating, and Matt Pryor’s voice sounds just as good as it did on 1997’s Four Minute Mile.  It’s another great representation of their classic rock abilities, while still showing the emo/indie world why these five guys from Eudora, Kansas, are true pioneers of the scene.

A Day to Remember – “Right Where You Want Me to Be” (2009): Released around the end of 2009, “Right Where You Want Me to Be, “ might be A Day to Remember’s best song yet, full of the punk-grooves-into-heavy-breakdowns the band is known for.  And yes, the gang screams that we’re all familiar with consistently show up throughout, perfectly rounding out a near-perfect song.

Hit the Lights – “Drop the Girl” (Skip School, Start Fights, Triple Crown, 2008): After losing frontman Colin Ross in 2007, Ohio pop/punkers Hit the Lights moved guitarist/backing vocalist Nick Thompson into the now-vacant slot and released a second full-length entitled Skip School, Start Fights in 2008.  The album’s second single, “Drop the Girl, “ perfectly represented a band that had not only underwent a massive change, but also taken two giant steps forward musically-kicking off with a simple techno beat and Thompson’s voice, along with a low-fi guitar riff, the song soon launches into a unrelenting series of verses and choruses that continually pummel the listener with sheer energy and entertainment.  Drummer Nate VanDame gives it his all, and the, “Whoa, “ chants in the choruses give it a Jerry Maguire sense of completion.  Yes, a typical emo breakdown is the basis for the bridge, but by that point the song can do no wrong.  Well done.