Posts Tagged ‘synthesizer’

Random song post, Volume 10

June 16, 2010

Had a little extra time on my hands.  Reviewed a few extra songs.  Here ya go.

All Time Low – “Lost In Stereo” (Nothing Personal, Hopeless, 2009): Fun, exciting rock from a band that could very well be sliding into Fall Out Boy and blink182’s shoes at this very moment.  With similarities to most of Cartel and New Found Glory’s respective catalogs of music, it’s a solid entry into the pop/punk genre.

The Spill Canvas – “Our Song” (Realities EP, Sire, 2010): Despite a noticeable gap since their last full-length, South Dakota’s The Spill Canvas have managed to tide us over with the recent release of two EPs, Abnormalities and Realities, the latter of which boasts the single, “Our Song, ” easily the epitome of everything this band stands for when it comes to music and a fine representation of their sound.  Frontman Nick Thomas’ distinctive, somewhat aggressive voice drives the song, while the rest of the band follows along nicely with appropriate guitars and drums.

Weezer – “I’m Your Daddy” (Raditude, DGC/Interscope, 2009): On Weezer’s seventh full-length Raditude, these emo/powerpop pioneers took their already diverse musical history into yet another direction, best indicated on songs like the singles, “(If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To, ” and, “I’m Your Daddy.  ”  It’s the latter of the two songs that sees frontman Rivers Cuomo in prime shape, bringing back a voice not heard since most of the 90s and a band that seems to remember how they used to sound.  With a fantastic mix of drum machines, synthesizer, and Weezer’s trademark over-the-top guitars, “I’m Your Daddy, ” stands as a great example of how far Weezer has come, and what they’re still capable of.

Silversun Pickups – “The Royal We” (Swoon, Dangerbird, 2009): Awesome.  Just awesome.  Hard to believe such a thunderous sound (especially during the chorus) could come from a bunch of shoegazers like the Silversun Pickups.  Touches of string instruments add to the tension ever present throughout the song, and frontman Brian Aubert’s voice sounds just as good as ever.

Tom Sawyer, a song by Rush

April 9, 2010

What can I say?  To try and analyze any one part of this song would be impossible, and to try and review the song as a whole would be like trying to review greatness itself.  If I had to pick something to say, it’d be that this song, well, completely rocks-everything, from the synthesizer, to the guitar solo, to Geddy Lee’s bass and distinctive vocals, to Neil Peart’s innovative drumming…that, truly, is what makes the song.  Were it not for Peart, the song would lack essentials like the sporadic tempo changes that give the song life and the unbelievable drum break towards the end.  But that’s not to say the rest of the band don’t give it their all-Lee’s synthesizer is unparalleled, and a neccessary part of the arrangement.  Alex Lifeson’s guitar solo need not be missed either, showing how much his musicianship adds to Rush’s music.

“My Dinosaur Life ” follow-up

March 31, 2010

Although I continue to stick by many of the comments I made in my first official blog post towards Motion City Soundtrack’s recently released My Dinosaur Life, I can’t deny how unbelievable the song, “Worker Bee, ” sounds in the following live videos:


Wow.  Talk about a song getting better when played live!

Oh, and while we’re on the subject of the new album, I must confess how much, “Pulp Fiction, ” has grown on me as of late.  It’s truly a superb song, with a welcome synthesizer part in the intro along with a bass sound that seems taken right from the Beastie Boys hit, “Sabotage, ” and Tony Thaxton’s usual dose of amazing drumming.  The chorus only improves on the greatness of the intro and verse, and helps to move things along.